adolescent drinking

Childhood Maltreatment Predicts Later Alcoholism

Ample evidence exists for higher rates of substance abuse and dependence among maltreated individuals (1) so much so that alcoholism and addiction for many represent a developmental cascade.

In clinical samples undergoing treatment for substance use disorders, between one third and two thirds evince child abuse and neglect histories (2-7).

In a survey in The USA, of over 100,000 youth in 6th though 12th grade, Harrison, Fulkerson, and Beebe (1997)  found that those reporting either physical or sexual abuse in childhood were from 2 to 4 times more likely to be using drugs than those not reporting abuse; the rates were even higher for youth reporting multiple forms of child maltreatment (8).

Similar findings (9,10) have been reported by Rodgers et al. (2004) and Moran, Vuchinich, and Hall (2004). Among youth with Child Protective Services documenting maltreatment, Kelly, Thornberry, and Smith (1999) reported one-third higher risk for drug use among those with an abuse history(11).

 

Substance-abuse-effects-families-300x169

 

In a large epidemiological study, Fergusson, Boden, and Horwood (2008) showed physical abuse and particularly sexual abuse to be related to illicit drug use, as well as abuse and dependence (12).

It also appears that  extreme economic deprivation characterizes many maltreating families who are residing in impoverished areas with substantial neighborhood disorganization and ample availability of drugs in the community(13).

Hawkins, Catalano, and Miller’s (1992) highlighted poor and inconsistent family management practices, high family conflict, and poor bonding to family as risks for adolescent substance abuse, and these factors also are characteristic of the dysfunction in maltreating families in which abuse and neglect occur.

These features are consistent with the progression of developmental failures exhibited by maltreated children (14).

Consequently, compromised adaptation in the social and academic arena contributes to association with deviant peers, who escalate the access to and modeling of substance abuse, contributing to early onset of drug use.

 

For many the propensity for later alcoholism and drug addiction are determined in part by genetic inheritance but all genetic transmission also relies on environmental conditions.

It would appear that abusive childhoods and emotional deprivation provide fertile grounds.

 

References

1.  Rogosch, F. A., Oshri, A., & Cicchetti, D. (2010). From child maltreatment to adolescent cannabis abuse and dependence: A developmental cascade model.Development and psychopathology22(04), 883-897.

2.  Bayatpour M, Wells RD, Holford S. Physical and sexual abuse as predictors of substance abuse and suicide among pregnant teenagers. Journal of Adolescent Health. 1992;13:128–132.

3. Cavaiola AA, Schiff M. Behavioral sequelae of physical and/or sexual abuse in adolescents. Child Abuse & Neglect.1988;12:181–188.

4. Dembo R, Dertke M, Borders S, Washburn M, Schmeidler J. The relationship between physical abuse, sexual abuse and tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug use among youths in a juvenile detention center. International Journal of the Addictions.1988;23:351–378

5. Edwall GE, Hoffman NG, Harrison PA. Psychological correlates of sexual abuse in adolescent girls in chemical dependency.Journal of Adolescent Chemical Dependency. 1989;1:53–68.

6. Pribor EF, Dinwiddie SH. Psychiatric correlates of incest in childhood. American Journal of Psychiatry. 1992;149:52–56.

7. Schaefer MR, Sobieragi K, Hollyfield RL. Prevalence of child physical abuse in adult male veteran alcoholics. Child Abuse & Neglect. 1988;12:141–150.

8. Harrison PA, Fulkerson JA, Beebe TJ. Multiple substance use among adolescent physical and sexual abuse victims. Child Abuse & Neglect. 1997;21:529–539.

9. Harrison PA, Fulkerson JA, Beebe TJ. Multiple substance use among adolescent physical and sexual abuse victims. Child Abuse & Neglect. 1997;21:529–539.

10. Moran PB, Vuchinich S, Hall NK. Associations between types of maltreatment and substance use during adolescence. Child Abuse & Neglect. 2004;28:565–574.

11. Kelly BT, Thornberry TP, Smith CA. In the wake of child maltreatment. Washington, DC: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; 1997. pp. 1–15.

12.  Fergusson DM, Boden JM, Horwood LJ. Exposure to childhood sexual and physical abuse and adjustment in early adulthood.Child Abuse & Neglect. 2008;32:607–619.

13.  Hawkins JD, Catalano RF, Miller JY. Risk and protective factors for alcohol and other drug problems in adolescence and early adulthood: Implications for substance abuse prevention. Psychological Bulletin.1992;112:64–105.

14. Cicchetti D, Valentino K. An ecological transactional perspective on child maltreatment: Failure of the average expectable environment and its influence upon child development. In: Cicchetti D, Cohen DJ, editors. Developmental psychopathology: Vol. 3. Risk, disorder, and adaptation. 2nd ed. New York: Wiley; 2006. pp. 129–201

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